Yo Momma Black... and She Hates Black Men?

July 13, 2018

 

"Yo' mama black."

 

"If you have something negative to say about black women, write it down and give it to your mother."

 

"White girls do it, too."

 

"You're intimidated by a strong, black woman."

 

"He hates himself, his mother, and his entire race."

 

If you're like most people, you've heard at least some of these quotes before. There are so many ways to call out the black man who doesn't like black women, that there are catchphrases devoted to him. Like most forms of supposed anti-sexism, a lot of work goes into holding black men accountable, while dismissing all conversation when it's the other way around. Look no further than the "coincidence" that the same people who talk like this are usually scared to call out black women who flat out hate black men.

 

Black women who believe that a man who tweets bad words about black women deserves to be shot by police while unarmed? Those women deserve a pass because a black man called them names. The black woman who will call the cops on an innocent black man, knowing how cops might treat him? Black men are supposed to love her anyway because she's the same race and gender as their mother. Black mothers who poison the minds of their own sons with their hatred of black men? Plenty of black men poison their daughters' minds, so it's only fair for women to join in.

 

As with all of my articles, I'm only talking about the women who do act this way. Save the "not all of us" and "b-b-b-but you're judging based on your few experiences" speeches for the female coons. Since some people prefer to deny that those women exist, here are a few examples. Or you can spend some time with men who know women like this.

 

With the endless talk about how poorly black men treat black women, there's no excuse for pretending that women can't be just as screwed up. Only God knows how people can discuss blacks promoting white supremacy, yet leave out the women who wish death on their own race of men. The fact that so many people choose to do so doesn't make anyone look good, and it certainly doesn't bring black men and women closer.

 

Just as some of you have seen nothing but positive women, some guys have seen nothing but negative women. Maybe we should call out black females who want black men dead as fast as we lose our shit over a man calling women names. Maybe then there wouldn't be as many so-called self-hating black men who are supposedly intimidated by black women.

 

Before writing the original version of this article back in March, I saw that clip from the show Iyanla: Fix My Life. The episode showed black men who don't date black women, telling a group of black women why they made that decision. A man named Koro took the hot seat, and he gave a powerful testimony about how black men and women are both hurt, and both need outlets for it. He talked about the constant discussions about the black woman's pain and justification for their anger towards all black men, and animosity towards black men who speak up about their own pain.

 

Meanwhile, some of the women sitting in front of him were clearly trying not to laugh. The comments were divisive, with men being able to relate, and many of the women getting offended. Women were making fun of him for crying, complaining about his not saying "not all women" after every sentence to soothe some guilty egos, and of course, bashing black men in general.

 

How do we get mad at men who find someone they're happy with, yet we're cool with women who bring down all black men because of their own experiences with a few? They'll say "every man I know is a criminal, a bum, etc." and we give them a pass. Man talks about disrespectful women, and he's the enemy for calling it out and doing them a favor by leaving? How do we preach about black love when we believe only one gender deserves support?

An entire lifetime of being conditioned that way can drive a human insane, especially when that person has to keep everything bottled up because "men have to be strong at all times." Then we wonder why men are so prone to rage and suicide.

 

Suicide is the third biggest killer of black males ages 15 to 24, and fifth for ages 10-14. The suicide rates of black boys aged 5 to 11 have doubled between 1993 and 2013. You're kidding yourself if you think the misandry that males put up with from childhood onward has nothing to do with it. How can some women call themselves a proud black mother of x amount of boys, yet trash the black man every chance they get? You don't care what black men are going through? Then you don't care what your sons are going through.

 

While some of you are shouting that the black man ain't shit and making fun of them for speaking up about their pain, your sons are listening to you. You're glad that black men are being shot by the cops? Your son heard that. When "hurt mothers" get a pass for abusing their sons, other boys are watching and not speaking up about their own abuse. Many black boys are taught from day one that their fate is to be either shot or arrested. They are told to "man up" and never ask for help, even when they are depressed. That is what the boys that some of you are raising are going through.

 

Since some of you love bragging about how you created the black man and mankind in general, can you guess who created and raised these boys who took their own lives so soon? Can you guess who is teaching black boys to look down on the black man, and therefore themselves? Can you guess who raised these men who have no respect for women? Hell, who spent the past few decades screaming they don't need a man and how men ain't shit, and are currently complaining about a lack of men leading them? What have YOU been doing for the community that you've been running so independently all this time?

 

Some of you are thinking, "well, what about deadbeat fathers? What about thugs and misogynists? What about black men who do all the things you call out black women for doing?" And I'm thinking, "what about them?" The world is already talking about what those men are doing. Go read just about every other article that talks about the black community; plenty of them only talk about men. Of course, those men have their share of responsibility. That's not what we're talking about here. No amount of deflection will deny the fact that there's a side that women need to own up to, which is what we're talking about here.

 

Not even black women who say positive things about black men are safe from the vitriol. Look at all the hate that women like Nicole Michelle get for not only keeping anti-black-man talk to a minimum, but teaching black women how to help themselves. The few Shahrazad Alis in the crowd get trashed for daring to talk about the woman's role in society's problems. She warned you in the 1980s about the effect that the "black man ain't shit, I don't need no man" mentality would have on your sons.

 

Yet you'd rather listen to actual self-hating men like Derrick Jaxn, who gladly contribute the problem just to impress you. Simps aren't empowering you to do anything except blame everyone else for your problems, then complain when someone asks you to do your part. Though if your ego is more important than the lives of the black boys you're raising, I can see how you'd fall for it. Any ounce of sense that these misandrist men have left in them must go into laughing at every woman-child who follows them.

 

If you ignore black women who hate black men, while expecting men to pander to them, then you're part of the problem with our race. Don't expect things to get better until everyone does their part in making it better. And you female coons want to be dominant? Enjoy being dominant over boys who have killed themselves before getting a chance to grow into the black man that you hate so much. Massa thanks you.

 

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